About Us

Mission

Founded in 2015 MorphOptic is perfecting the process of making large-scale optical mirrors.

MorphOptic, Inc. has fused highly parallel information technology with imaging optical science to develop high quality, low mass, optical components that can be inexpensively mass produced. We develop advanced image-based tools for precision metrology that enable these technologies.


Who are we?

Partial team picture. Joe Ritter, Jeff Kuhn, Ian Cunnyngham

MorphOptic, Inc. was formed by a group of PhD physicists and optical scientists at the University of Hawaii to exploit a new technology for forming inexpensive, large, light-weight and highly accurate parabolic mirrors. Our team includes expertise from the Hawaii solar power industry, in combination with international and NASA prize-winning researchers and technologists who have developed some of the most innovative optical concepts in astronomical telescopes during the last two decades.


Why mirror technologies?

Accurate imaging and energy collection mirrors are cost-drivers in optical systems as diverse as concentrated solar power units to free- space optical communication dishes. Hybrid concentrated solar power (HCPV) is a technology destined to increase the total useable solar power in both residential and commercial applications by a factor of 3 over flat PV panels – MorphOptic is enabling this with their mirrors in roof-mountable modular systems.


Where are we headed?

High-concentration photovoltaic prototype

MorphOptic is working with technology partners from California, Florida and Germany to develop the world’s most efficient and inexpensive modular HCPV system. We’re showing how precise mirrors can make distributed hydrogen gas production economical, and how large imaging mirrors for optical communication and remote sensing can be manufactured with 1/10 the weight and cost of conventional mirrors.


Current status

MorphOptic is working with technology partners from California, Florida and Germany to develop the world’s most efficient and inexpensive modular HCPV system. We’re showing how precise mirrors can make distributed hydrogen gas production economical, and how large imaging mirrors for optical communication and remote sensing can be manufactured with 1/10 the weight and cost of conventional mirrors.